[inforoots] Origin of the IBM 1130 Name

utleyb at aol.com utleyb at aol.com
Mon Oct 30 12:58:12 PST 2006


 You are correct on CADET. The 1130 was code named SECS for Small Engineerng Computing System. The idea was who could turn down SECS?
 
 Brian Utley 
    
 -----Original Message-----
 From: van.snyder at jpl.nasa.gov
 To: inforoots at computerhistory.org
 Sent: Mon, 30 Oct 2006 2:18 PM
 Subject: Re: [inforoots] Origin of the IBM 1130 Name
 
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On Mon, 2006-10-30 at 07:34 -0800, Bill Worthington wrote:

> I'm not sure what the logic was in selecting machine numbers back in
> the 1960s.  There did see to be some order to it however.  I believe
> that they were all assigned by the product marketing folks in White
> Plains.  Development had their own names for unannounced machines like
> NS, FS, Shark, etc.  (This was good because some of them never saw the
> light of day.)

I understand 1620 was called CADET, not because it was a beginner
machine, but because it meant "Can't Add, Doesn't Even Try" (the
arithmetic was done with lookup tables, with a little bit of hardware
help for multiply/divide).  We had telemetry-processing applications on
1620's that changed the adder table to think in octal.

I understand the 1400 series number came from the original 1400-
character memory size.

Of course, I could be wrong on both scores.

-- 
Van Snyder                    |  What fraction of Americans believe 
Van.Snyder at jpl.nasa.gov       |  Wrestling is real and NASA is fake?
Any alleged opinions are my own and have not been approved or
disapproved by JPL, CalTech, NASA, the President, or anybody else.
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